Arroyo Seco Foundation

Steelhead in the Arroyo Featured in New Exhibit and Book

The fascinating story of steelhead in the Arroyo Seco is featured in a new book, "Against the Currents," published by the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach. John G. Tomlinson, Jr., tells the story of Charles Holder of Valley Hunt Club fame and his depictions of this spectacular fish and how it used to frolic in the Arroyo Seco stream.

Steelhead begin their lives as rainbow trout in the mountain watershed and then migrate to the ocean where they make the physical transformation into steelhead. Later they would return to their stream of origin to spawn and die.

The Aquarium of the Pacific has also installed a permanent exhibit on the steelhead in Southern California as part of their watershed exhibit.

There are still native rainbow trout in the mountain watershed of the Arroyo Seco. During flood events some of them reach the Pacific Ocean, but will they ever be able to return to spawn? The Arroyo Seco, as Holder and Tomlinson document, is the most likely stream to restore steelhead in the Los Angeles River system.

The Lower Arroyo Trees Are Saved

Over 400 people signed our recent petition to save four native trees in Lower Arroyo Park that were slated to removed. The space occupied by three coast live oaks and a California sycamore would have been used to expand fly casting programming. The strong and prompt community action was another demonstration of the strong support for protecting and preserving the natural character of the Arroyo.

You can view the petition and community responses here.

The Successful Petition | ASF Letter to City Manager Beck

We Salute Mayor Garcetti and a United Community

Last Fall the Arroyo Seco Foundation and more than a dozen community organizations united together at the LA River Rally in support of Alternative 20, the most ambitious proposal of the US Army Corps of Engineers' ARBOR Plan to restore the Los Angeles River.

It didn't look very hopeful. The national office of the Corps seemed intent on going with a more modest proposal, but united community support and Mayor Garcetti's dynamic leadership turned the tide.

On May 28, 2014 the Corps announced that they will back Alt 20. It's a tremendous victory for the future of the Los Angeles River.

Coverage: LA Times  |  KCET  |  LAist

Pasadena Council Adopts Sediment Recommendations

On Monday, May 12, the Pasadena City Council adopted the recommendations of the Devil's Gate Sediment Working Group. This group was established by Pasadena to develop a more sustainable alternative to those presented in the LA County Flood Control District's Draft Environmental Impact Report on the Devil's Gate Sediment Removal and Management Project.

The Pasadena Sediment Plan would substantially reduce the scope and negative impacts of the Flood Control District's program, while protecting the neighborhoods and rare environmental values of Hahamongna Watershed Park and the Arroyo Seco.

Recommendations of the Sediment Working Group

Council Agenda Report

Sediment Working Group Slides

Exceptional Drought Highlights Need for Water Conservation

Western U.S. Drought Map With "exceptional drought" declared in part of the state, the first ever zero allocation of water from the State Water Project, and numerous fires, we want to remind Southern Califorians that there are many ways that all of us can do our share to conserve water. It may be as small as fixing a leak or as large as installing a drought-tolerant garden.

Here's Something Real You Can Do About the Drought - Click Here:

Arroyo Seco Canyon Project

Arroyo Seco Canyon ProkectThe Final Conceptual Design Report for the Arroyo Seco Canyon Project is now available for public review! Thanks to all those who participated in the workshops and sent in comments. ASF, the City of Pasadena, and Carollo Engineers worked hard to incorporate public input as much as possible. The result, we hope, is a project that will not only integrate water resources, habitat, and recreation but will also satisfy the needs and desires of the community.

While there is no formal public comment period for this stage in the design, please feel free to direct any questions, comments, or concerns to Rebecca Shields Moose (rebecca@arroyoseco.org) and Gary Takara (gtakara@cityofpasadena.net).